Bacterial surface properties of clinically isolated Staphylococcus epidermidis strains determine adhesion on polyethylene

Bacterial surface properties of clinically isolated Staphylococcus epidermidis strains determine adhesion on polyethylene

Bacterial surface properties of clinically isolated Staphylococcus epidermidis strains determine adhesion on polyethylene

Abstract

The role of surface physiochemical properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains in adhesion to polyethylene (PE) was investigated under physiological flow conditions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and 1% platelet poor plasma (PPP). Four clinically isolated strains were divided into two groups: low and high relative hydrophobicity, and the F1198 and RP62A strains showing significantly greater hydrophobicity than the F21 and F1018 strains. In PBS, adhesion of all S. epidermidis strains was shear dependent from 0 to 15 dyn/cm2, after which adhesion becomes shear independent. Strains with higher surface hydrophobicity showed higher adhesion to PE, demonstrating the influence of bacterial surfacehydrophobicity in nonspecific adhesion. Bacterial adhesion correlated well with bacterial surface hydrophobicity at low shear stresses (0-8 dyn/cm2). In 1% PPP, adhesion of all strains dramatically decreased and we found no correlation between bacterial surface hydrophobicity and adhesion. The presence of plasma proteins reduced nonspecific adhesion. S. epidermidis surface charge did not correlate with bacterial adhesion in either test media. The results suggested that S. epidermidis surface hydrophobicity may mediate nonspecific adhesion to PE at low shear stresses in protein-free media.

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