Characteristics of IL-6 and TNF-a Production by Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Macrophages in the Neonate

Characteristics of IL-6 and TNF-a Production by Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Macrophages in the Neonate

Characteristics of IL-6 and TNF-a Production by Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Macrophages in the Neonate

Abstract

The production of IL-6 and TNF-alpha and the expression of their mRNA were studied with neonatal (cord blood) and adult blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after in vitro infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Cord blood MDM exhibited production of high levels of IL-6 within 24 hr after infection. Little or no IL-6 production was detected after 24-48 hr and after in vitro stimulation with inactivated (nonreplicating) virus. Adult blood MDM also produced high levels of IL-6 within 24 hr of RSV infection. Unlike cord blood MDM, adult MDM demonstrated significant activity of IL-6 after 24 hr of infection with live RSV and after exposure to the inactivated virus. The pattern of TNF-alpha production by cord and adult blood MDM after live RSV infection resembled closely the pattern of IL-6 production. Both cell types produced TNF-alpha in the first 24 hr after infection. However, little or no production was observed after 24 hr of infection and after exposure to the inactivated virus. The profile of mRNA expression was similar to the production of IL-6 or TNF-alpha. mRNA expression occurred over a shorter period in cord blood MDM. These observations suggest that inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-alpha, are produced by neonatal as well as previously primed adult macrophages. However, neonatal cells may be less efficient in inducing IL-6 production.

read online

 

Post Comment