Medicine

Concurrent Symposium IX: Commercialization, Ethics and Policy of Nanomedicine

Concurrent Symposium IX: Commercialization, Ethics and Policy of Nanomedicine

Concurrent Symposium IX: Commercialization, Ethics and Policy of Nanomedicine

Recent years have been marked by the emergence of new disruptive
physical, chemical, and biological innovations that are driven by the vast
scientific and technical capabilities provided by nanotechnology. The
essence of nanotechnology is the ability to engineer the individual building
blocks of matter at the molecular level, atom by atom, to form a link between
the nanoscale and the micro- and even, macroscale with precisely controlled
functionality and customized properties/performance. Through the exploitation
of intrinsic and engineered behaviors of such materials, unique
biosensors can be created. Integrating cells/tissues/biomolecules with
computer chip platforms leverages Nature and state of the art IC fabrication
methods. The linkage between animate and inanimate components provides
the key to expanding the range of possible experiments and resulting
sensors. Recent results from Bio/Nanotechnology research projects at the
University at Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering
(CNSE) will be presented against a backdrop of the infrastructure
development at CNSE. Specifically, this presentation focuses on the
development of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based devices
for lab-on-a-chip bio-applications. These biochips are designed to allow cell
secretion (exocytosis) studies by enabling parallel electrochemical detection
with millisecond resolution. This secretion is triggered by toxins in the cell’s
environment.

 

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