DNA isolation from a dried blood sample, PCR amplification, and population analysis: Making the most of commercially available kits

DNA isolation from a dried blood sample, PCR amplification, and population analysis: Making the most of commercially available kits

DNA isolation from a dried blood sample, PCR amplification, and population analysis: Making the most of commercially available kits

Abstract

The techniques used in a biochemistry laboratory are constantly changing as new methodologies are developed by industry. Educators have a responsibility to the student population to keep up with the changing biochemistry laboratory. Several laboratory manuals have recently been
published that reflect the myriad areas of biochemistry that can be incorporated into the undergraduate experience [1, 2]. In fact, it seems impossible to explore all the areas of biochemistry in any depth in a single-semester laboratory course. Over 400 institutions nationwide have instituted undergraduate biochemistry majors to more fully cover the range of biochemical topics [3]. In order to provide students with an exposure to both protein purification techniques and molecular biological techniques, Georgia Southern University presently offers two semesters of biochemistry within the chemistry department. Each course has a laboratory component that allows the undergraduate exposure to a wide variety of biochemical techniques. At Georgia Southern University, students gain experiences in protein purification during Biochemistry I [4] and are then led through a set of standard molecular biological techniques during Biochemistry II.

 

 

read-online

Post Comment