Possible role of a-1-microglobulin in mediating bacterial attachment to model surfaces

Possible role of a-1-microglobulin in mediating bacterial attachment to model surfaces

Possible role of a-1-microglobulin in mediating bacterial attachment to model surfaces

Abstract

Urine proteins in the molecular weight range of 9-137 kDa deposit to an equal extent from pooled human urine onto glass (12.7 +/- 1.9 micrograms/cm) and polystyrene (11.8 +/- 1.8 micrograms/cm). Selective desorption of the proteins was achieved by washing with water or water/isopropanol mixtures. Irrespective of the washing process, proteins of molecular weight greater than 90 kDa remained associated with bothsurfaces while water washings alone removed most low molecular weight material. A 29 kDa protein, alpha-1-microglobulin, was removed from glass by water washing but required a 30% (v/v) isopropanol wash to desorb from polystyrene, implying attachment via hydrophobic bonding. The adhesion to polystyrene surfaces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa B4, a clinical isolate from a urinary tract infection (UTI), was strongly associated with the presence of alpha-1-microglobulin, which may be acting as a mediator of bacterial adhesion.

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