Role of MHC class Ib molecule, H2-M3 in host immunity against tuberculosis

Role of MHC class Ib molecule, H2-M3 in host immunity against tuberculosis

Role of MHC class Ib molecule, H2-M3 in host immunity against tuberculosis

Abstract

The MHC class I family comprises both classical (class Ia) and non-classical (class Ib) members. While the prime function of classical MHC class I molecules (MHC class Ia) is to present peptide antigens to pathogen-specific cytotoxic T cells, non-classical MHC-I (MHC class Ib) antigens perform diverse array of functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. Vaccines against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis need to induce strong cellular immune responses. Recent studies have shown that MHC class I molecules play an important role in the protective immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Both MHC Ia-restricted and MHC class Ib-restricted M. tuberculosis -reactive CD8(+) T cells have been identified in humans and mice, but their relative contributions to immunity is still uncertain. Unlike MHC class Ia-restricted CD8(+) T cells, MHC class Ib-restricted CD8(+) T cells are constitutively activated in naive animals and respond rapidly to infection challenge, hence filling the temporal gap between innate and adaptive immunity. The present review article summarizes the general host immunity against M. tuberculosis infection highlighting the possible role of MHC class Ib molecule, H2-M3 and their ligands (N-formylated peptides) in protection against tuberculosis.
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