Subcutaneous abscess formation around catheters induced by viable and nonviable Staphylococcus epidermidis as well as by small amounts of bacterial cell wall components

Subcutaneous abscess formation around catheters induced by viable and nonviable Staphylococcus epidermidis as well as by small amounts of bacterial cell wall components

Subcutaneous abscess formation around catheters induced by viable and nonviable Staphylococcus epidermidis as well as by small amounts of bacterial cell wall components

Abstract

The use of catheters is often complicated by infection, mainly due to Staphylococcus epidermidis. Recently, a novel poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-grafted silicone elastomer catheter (SEpvp) was introduced. Less bacteria adhered to SEpvp than to conventional SE catheters in vitro. The frequency of S.epidermidis infection associated with SEpvp and SE was assessed in a rabbit model. Unexpectedly, abscesses were induced by the injection of low numbers of S. epidermidis along subcutaneously inserted SEpvp. No abscesses were seen around SE, even when very high numbers of S.epidermidis were injected. This bioincompatibility reaction observed around the SEpvp was independent of the host, bacterial strain, and method of inoculation. Abscesses were also induced by nonviable S. epidermidis and by bacterial cell wall components. Because these incompatibility reactions were not observed in the absence of bacteria, biocompatibility testing should include experiments in which the inflammatory effects of the combination of catheter and (non)viable bacteria are tested.

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